The Global Urbanist

News and analysis of cities around the world

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After spending over six years conducting research on urban planning in Iraq, Sebastian Schulz and Niran Banna explore how war and terrorism turned a once-cosmopolitan city into a divided metropolis.

Unlike a wound to the body, the marks left behind a wound to a city may be of the city's own designs, in the form of a memorial. A memorial which Sam Valentine argues is now needed to restore dignity to the act of remembrance.

A chart doing the rounds of social media shows what a tangled mess the Middle East is. But if we tease it apart, we see a region neatly divided into two camps; it's just that one is divided amongst itself.

From the Archives

Extract - Mogadishu Then and Now

In this extract from their forthcoming book, Rasna Warah and Mohamud Diriye recount the history of Mogadishu from its origins in Arab and Persian trade to the outbreak of civil war in 1991.

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About

The Global Urbanist is an online magazine reviewing urban affairs and urban development issues in cities throughout the developed and developing world.

Its readers are drawn from the urban policy and international development sectors, and include urban planners, officers in local, national or international government agencies, civil society leaders, and researchers.

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